Quick question...Where does the grease go? ..Edited... - Page 3 - GM Forum - Buick, Cadillac, Chev, Olds, GMC & Pontiac chat


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Old 09-10-2007, 03:40 PM   #21
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I dont want to derail the thread, but I just wanted to mention that I was told to use anti-seize on my spark plugs on all of my cars. I have not experienced any ill effects as a result.

I have read that it can act as a lubricant, and thus can result in over-torquing. Thus ive been thinking of late that using anti-seize on spark plugs isnt necessarily a good idea. A proper torque is all it needs.
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Old 09-10-2007, 05:24 PM   #22
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I think that makes you #5.
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Old 09-10-2007, 06:00 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillBoost37
Quote:
Originally Posted by samueljackson
those are delco originals. they are "fine wire". supposed to be like that.

personally i prefer the delco iridiums part # 41-101. which ngk makes any way. but theres many guys here that like the ngk resistor plugs better. especially on the L67. to each their own.
There is no such thing as a "fine wire" plug. Those are factory Iridiums. The NGK Iridiums you mention look identical those that Skippy pulled. As well..the preference of a copper plug vs Iridium comes from cost and benefit of materials. A copper plug will need to be replaced much more often, however when modding that is a normal occurance. Copper has been found to throw a better spark than the Iridium, the only downfall is the softer materials it is made from degrade faster.
no, technically not. i just see that in the application books, and get in habit of saying "fine wire".
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Old 09-10-2007, 06:09 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boreas
I dont want to derail the thread, but I just wanted to mention that I was told to use anti-seize on my spark plugs on all of my cars. I have not experienced any ill effects as a result.

I have read that it can act as a lubricant, and thus can result in over-torquing. Thus ive been thinking of late that using anti-seize on spark plugs isnt necessarily a good idea. A proper torque is all it needs.
over torquing would be installer error, not necessarily the fault of the antizeize itself. i would definitely agree that many seized plugs are a result of over torquing though.

but i believe it is necessary to use it on aluminum heads. i dont know exactly what it is . but theres something about 2 different metals, together going through all the elements, and heat that can cause them to seize.
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Old 09-10-2007, 08:29 PM   #25
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The issue with aluminum heads and steel plugs that causes the problem is called "galvanic corrosion". This happens often when two dissimilar metals are mated together for long periods of time. Then , to make matters worse, they are subjected to hundreds of hot and cold cycles.

To help explain this, I've included info from one of the many sites that discuss this.

The Thelen Channel
Quote:
Galvanic Corrosion Chart


Galvanic corrosion is the corrosion that results when two dissimilar metals with different potentials are placed in electrical contact in an electrolyte.

A difference in electrical potential exists between the different metals and serves as the driving force for electrical current flow through the corrodant or electrolyte. This current results in corrosion of one of the metals. The larger the potential difference, the greater the probability of galvanic corrosion.

Galvanic corrosion only causes deterioration of one of the metals. The less resistant, active metal becomes the anodic corrosion site. The stronger, more noble metal is cathodic and protected.

Galvanic corrosion potential is a measure of how dissimilar metals will corrode when placed against each other in an assembly. Metals close to one another on the chart generally do not have a strong effect on one another, but the farther apart any two metals are separated, the stronger the corroding effect on the one higher in the table.

This table lists the potential differences for various metals in water. The order of the series can change for different electrolytes (for example, different pH, ions in solution).

I have omitted Stainless steel alloys from this table as they can significantly change their potential and become much more active if exposed to stagnant or poorly aerated water.

Electrode Potential at 77 F (25 C)
Element Standard Electrode Potential (Volts)

Anodic end (this is where the corrosion occurs)

Lithium -3.045

Aluminum -1.670

Zinc -0.762
Chromium -0.744
Iron; Mild Steel -0.440
Cadmium -0.402

Copper +0.340

Cathodic end, passive - (no corrosion here)
I've only included just a part of the info here to illustrate. For more info, google search on "Galvanic Corrosion Table" or check this simple site.

Bottom line is that you DO want to use anti-sieze when putting plugs in an aluminum head. I've had to have a head drilled and coil tapped for plugs on a forklift for this very reason.
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