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Old 05-13-2014, 09:54 AM   #11
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When you consider how many times you will do a rear brake job on vehicles with rear disc brakes, compared to this set up, it is sweet......

First time I ran into this set up, that single spring was a pain in the butt.....then the tool guy came around with this tool, and it was so easy to do....

Usually, a lot of brake dust back there, so wash down with Brake Klean....I always use never seize....use it on the adjuster screw, and also on the "lands" on the backing plate, that should be sanded down......now would be the time to replace rear wheel cylinders if they are leaking.......chances are, those drums can be turned, especially if this is the first brake job......even with 100-150K on them......then adjust the shoes outward until the drums have a little resistance when being put on.........I put the drum on, give a pull on the e-brake cable for that side, and then spin it.....if it spins easy, take the drum off, adjust outward slightly more, and repeat until there is a slight drag.........final adjustment can be done just by backing the car up and hitting the brakes a few times....

My wife'* old Bonneville, had her front pads replaced at 60K and 120K.....all I had to do was clean the rear brakes of break dust, and lube the adjuster and lands......she traded in the car at 170K, and the rears were still going strong....
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Old 05-13-2014, 10:34 AM   #12
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The only thing I ever struggled with when doing a drum brake job is getting the old drums off. I find it tricky to reach in with a hook (usually made from coat hanger wire) to catch and pull on the adjuster release bar while reaching in with a screw driver to spin the adjuster wheel to release the brakes. Do you guys who do this professionally have a better way? Do you just beat the drums off with a 15 pound persuader?
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Old 05-13-2014, 11:29 AM   #13
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Seems the rear brakes don't take the brunt of the force when stopping, I have replaced my front pads a few times, but the rear brake shoes/drums have 135k on them, I never thought to remove the drum and put anti-seize on the adjuster, and the bleeders when I do the drums, but in the future I may start occasionally doing so, thank you for those tips.
I just hope that while doing the job I won't have to do the brake lines any time soon.
i dont even remember how many fronts i have had to do, its been a ton. maybe every other year with her doing 15 to 20k a year

depends on the car, ifs its been a more southern car you wont have to do lines and put never seize and such nearly as much, this is all caused by the salt we have. i pretty much figure if a line goes i do them all because they will be soon to go.
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Old 05-13-2014, 09:13 PM   #14
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Last I heard, it was a 80/20 split. 80% of the braking is done up front, 20% in the rear. Thus why we go through pads quicker than shoes.
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Old 05-13-2014, 09:58 PM   #15
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When you consider how many times you will do a rear brake job on vehicles with rear disc brakes, compared to this set up, it is sweet......

First time I ran into this set up, that single spring was a pain in the butt.....then the tool guy came around with this tool, and it was so easy to do....

Usually, a lot of brake dust back there, so wash down with Brake Klean....I always use never seize....use it on the adjuster screw, and also on the "lands" on the backing plate, that should be sanded down......now would be the time to replace rear wheel cylinders if they are leaking.......chances are, those drums can be turned, especially if this is the first brake job......even with 100-150K on them......then adjust the shoes outward until the drums have a little resistance when being put on.........I put the drum on, give a pull on the e-brake cable for that side, and then spin it.....if it spins easy, take the drum off, adjust outward slightly more, and repeat until there is a slight drag.........final adjustment can be done just by backing the car up and hitting the brakes a few times....

My wife'* old Bonneville, had her front pads replaced at 60K and 120K.....all I had to do was clean the rear brakes of break dust, and lube the adjuster and lands......she traded in the car at 170K, and the rears were still going strong....
When I do the job I'll be replacing the wheel cylinders, I could probably have the drums turned, but I already have 2 new OE cast iron AC Delco drums to go on it, would it be good to have them turned a little?
I ask because I know some pros like to have front rotors turned a little before installing them.
I have some Break Klean, but I may need to get a second can of it, as it sounds like one may not be enough, I want to get all of that brake dust out of there.

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Originally Posted by 2kg4u View Post
The only thing I ever struggled with when doing a drum brake job is getting the old drums off. I find it tricky to reach in with a hook (usually made from coat hanger wire) to catch and pull on the adjuster release bar while reaching in with a screw driver to spin the adjuster wheel to release the brakes. Do you guys who do this professionally have a better way? Do you just beat the drums off with a 15 pound persuader?
That is probably my biggest concern, if I can get it off I think I'll be good to go, I do have a nice 5lb sledge just in case, hopefully I won't need it!

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i dont even remember how many fronts i have had to do, its been a ton. maybe every other year with her doing 15 to 20k a year

depends on the car, ifs its been a more southern car you wont have to do lines and put never seize and such nearly as much, this is all caused by the salt we have. i pretty much figure if a line goes i do them all because they will be soon to go.
I guess I am lucky I do not have to drive the car more than I do, here in VA we get a bit of salt on the roads in the winter, but not as much as you guys in NY get.

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Last I heard, it was a 80/20 split. 80% of the braking is done up front, 20% in the rear. Thus why we go through pads quicker than shoes.
Sounds about right, at least according to how much I have had to change the front brakes.


Thanks for the feedback, and tips guys, I do appreciate it!
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Old 05-13-2014, 10:10 PM   #16
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Another thing I've noticed years ago. Long story, but I'll try and shorten it.

Back when I use to be a really impatient driver, (I mean YEARS ago) and I use to use the brakes real hard, many times I'd panic brake to a stop(you know, typical teen not paying attention). But what I did notice was, my rotors were always warping. Now, this is just my little theory, but if one were to slam on the brakes and hold the car with those hot brakes, this is what makes the rotors warp.
Once I learned not to do that anymore, I've noticed no more warped rotors.
So, increase your following distance, and if you do have to stop hard, stop shorter than you need to and pop it into neutral so you can let off the brakes a little and maybe roll forward some. This keeps the hot rotors from sitting in one spot.
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Old 05-13-2014, 10:27 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Mike1995 View Post
Another thing I've noticed years ago. Long story, but I'll try and shorten it.

Back when I use to be a really impatient driver, (I mean YEARS ago) and I use to use the brakes real hard, many times I'd panic brake to a stop(you know, typical teen not paying attention). But what I did notice was, my rotors were always warping. Now, this is just my little theory, but if one were to slam on the brakes and hold the car with those hot brakes, this is what makes the rotors warp.
Once I learned not to do that anymore, I've noticed no more warped rotors.
So, increase your following distance, and if you do have to stop hard, stop shorter than you need to and pop it into neutral so you can let off the brakes a little and maybe roll forward some. This keeps the hot rotors from sitting in one spot.
Good tip, I tend to follow at a good distance now, there were times back in the day were I'd ride somebodies tail that would not do close to the speed limit, and or pass them double line or not, of course now I am a much more sensible driver, I drive my car like a granny would, mainly because ever since I seen big bits if that 4th clutch thrust washer in the transmission filter, I have been afraid to push it, as I cannot afford a rebuild at this time.
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Old 05-14-2014, 07:48 AM   #18
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i drive like i got to pay for my own gas and repairs.
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Old 05-14-2014, 08:16 AM   #19
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i drive like i got to pay for my own gas and repairs.
Ha ha, very well said Justin!
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Old 05-14-2014, 11:39 AM   #20
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William I have never heard of turning new rotors or drums before installation......kind of defeats the purpose of getting them if the old ones are still within spec.....problem I see, are those extremely cheap products....can almost guarantee within a year, you will have pulsation problems.....Even had them pulsate right out of the box......

But I will say this.....the main cause of pulsation is improper torquing of lug nuts after rotations.....and yes, if you drive like a madman like Mike use to, overheating those rotors/drums will cause pulsations, too.....we had one guy with a Buick Century, who had pulsating drums on a regular basis........how many people actually use their e-brake? Well, this guy did.....he would really apply his e-brakes to his hot drums, and that would cause the pulsations......finally convinced him to only use the e-brake when parking on a hill.....problem solved....
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