97 olds 88 rear shoes click/clunk - Page 3 - GM Forum - Buick, Cadillac, Chev, Olds, GMC & Pontiac chat


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Old 02-02-2014, 05:07 PM   #21
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Unfortunately our drums do not adjust that way. They adjust on their own with moderate application of the brakes.
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Old 02-02-2014, 06:52 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by rjolly87 View Post
Unfortunately our drums do not adjust that way. They adjust on their own with moderate application of the brakes.
Re: How do drum brakes self-adjust?
The self-adjusting brake mechanism consists of an actuating link, adjuster lever, adjuster lever return spring, override spring and override pivot.

The self-adjusting brake mechanism operates only When the brakes are applied while the car is moving rearward and only when the secondary shoe moves a pre-determined distance toward the brake drum.

As the car moves rearward and the brakes are applied friction between the primary shoe and the drum forces the primary shoe against the anchor pin. Hydraulic pressure in the wheel cylinder forces the upper end of the secondary shoe away from the anchor pin. As the secondary shoe moves away from the anchor pin, the upper end of the adjuster lever is prevented from moving by the actuating link. This causes the adjuster lever to pivot on the secondary shoe forcing the adjuster lever against the adjusting screw sprocket. If the brake linings are worn enough to allow the secondary shoe to move the pre-determined distance, the adjuster lever will turn the adjusting screw sprocket one or two teeth, depending on lining. wear. If the secondary shoe does not move the pre-determined distance, movement of the adjuster lever will not be great enough to rotate the adjusting screw sprocket.

When the brakes are released, the adjusting lever return spring will move the adjuster lever into the adjusting position on the sprocket.

An override feature is built into the self-adjusting brake which allows the secondary shoe to be applied in reverse in the event the adjusting screw becomes "frozen" preventing the self-adjuster from operating.

When the car is moving forward and the brakes are applied, the upper end of the secondary shoe is forced against the anchor pin due to the selfenergizing action of the brakes, and the selfadjuster does not operate.


I borrowed this from another site as apparently I'm afflicted with "CRS"


2004 Bonne SLE
1971 Chevelle SS
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Old 02-02-2014, 07:04 PM   #23
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CRS? What'* that?
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Old 02-02-2014, 07:19 PM   #24
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CRS? What'* that?
Can't Remember Shy*

2004 Bonne SLE
1971 Chevelle SS
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Old 02-02-2014, 07:21 PM   #25
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Oh, CantRememberShit... Roger.
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Old 02-02-2014, 10:06 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garagerog View Post
Re: How do drum brakes self-adjust?
The self-adjusting brake mechanism consists of an actuating link, adjuster lever, adjuster lever return spring, override spring and override pivot.

The self-adjusting brake mechanism operates only When the brakes are applied while the car is moving rearward and only when the secondary shoe moves a pre-determined distance toward the brake drum.

As the car moves rearward and the brakes are applied friction between the primary shoe and the drum forces the primary shoe against the anchor pin. Hydraulic pressure in the wheel cylinder forces the upper end of the secondary shoe away from the anchor pin. As the secondary shoe moves away from the anchor pin, the upper end of the adjuster lever is prevented from moving by the actuating link. This causes the adjuster lever to pivot on the secondary shoe forcing the adjuster lever against the adjusting screw sprocket. If the brake linings are worn enough to allow the secondary shoe to move the pre-determined distance, the adjuster lever will turn the adjusting screw sprocket one or two teeth, depending on lining. wear. If the secondary shoe does not move the pre-determined distance, movement of the adjuster lever will not be great enough to rotate the adjusting screw sprocket.

When the brakes are released, the adjusting lever return spring will move the adjuster lever into the adjusting position on the sprocket.

An override feature is built into the self-adjusting brake which allows the secondary shoe to be applied in reverse in the event the adjusting screw becomes "frozen" preventing the self-adjuster from operating.

When the car is moving forward and the brakes are applied, the upper end of the secondary shoe is forced against the anchor pin due to the selfenergizing action of the brakes, and the selfadjuster does not operate.


I borrowed this from another site as apparently I'm afflicted with "CRS"


2004 Bonne SLE
1971 Chevelle SS
This is likely the case for the traditional setup, but we don't have the traditional setup. I have only seen this setup on our cars, and are not side specific (no leading trailing, both sides are exactly the same as you look at them).

I just double checked in the FSM for my car, and it confirms the brakes self adjust with application, and no motion is necessary.
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Old 02-03-2014, 01:36 AM   #27
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Last edited by johnblazer; 02-03-2014 at 01:39 AM.
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Old 02-03-2014, 01:53 AM   #28
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Old 02-03-2014, 02:00 AM   #29
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this guy above is a bit goofy.... but gives you the idea.... only thing I did not do is lube the backing plate... must be the issue why I get the clunks/clicks
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Old 02-07-2014, 06:32 PM   #30
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The H bodies uses the same drum set up as The Citation if I remember correctly.
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