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1992-1999 Series I L27 (1992-1994 SE,SLE, SSE) & Series II L36 (1995-1999 SE, SSE, SLE) and common problems for the Series I and II L67 (all supercharged models 92-99) Including Olds 88's, Olds LSS's and Buick Lesabres Please use General Chat for non-mechanical issues, and Performance and Brainstorming for improvements.

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Old 02-26-2010, 03:28 AM   #1
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Hey everyone, I put my car in the ditch here about 2 months ago, I cracked the bumper in a few spots and was wondering what some easy fixes for that would be that I can do myself? Keep in mind i have little expeirence working with automobiles... Also I was wondering what size the fog lights are? are they a 5inch? Both of mine smashed and blew out when I ditched the car as well and i'm looking to just purchase some from C-Tire if I can find some that line up in the holes well,,,
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Old 03-02-2010, 10:41 PM   #2
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General Plastic Repair Instructions
The following procedures should be followed when repairing all types of thermoset plastic:

Use the supplies and the repair materials from the same manufacturer. Do not intermix systems. Mixing materials from different manufacturers can produce unsatisfactory results.
Clean the inner and outer surfaces of the repair area with a soap impregnated scouring pad in order to remove any dirt or mold release agent. A mold release agent is used during manufacturing in order to prevent the part from sticking to the mold. This release agent may be present in large enough concentrations to affect adhesion.
After washing, clean the area a second time with naptha solvent. Use only enough of the remover to dampen a cloth. Too much of the solvent will saturate the panel and may migrate out later, affecting the finish. Use a tack rag and air for finish cleanup. Allow the panel to dry thoroughly.
Apply force around the damaged area in order to look for hidden damage such as hairline cracks. Small cracks and faults in the bonds and the panels will eventually grow larger if left unattended. Drill a 3 mm (1/8 in) hole at each end of a crack in order to prevent any further cracking.
Remove the surface finish from the area to be repaired. Adhesives are designed to adhere to the plastic substrate, not the finish.

Important
Some adhesives require the use of a primer when bonding to metal. Use only the primers that are approved by the manufacturer'*. If you are bonding a composite panel to a metal surface, follow the adhesive manufacturers recommendations on how the metal should be prepared.


Repair the inner surface of the panel first.
When using a mat reinforcement to repair the inner or outer surface of a panel, inspect that there are no strands of the mat left uncovered or unsaturated with the repair material. If exposed, the mat may act as a wick and draw moisture into the repair area, affecting the integrity and the finish.
Inspect the rear of the damaged panel for tool clearance. If accessing the repair with a saturation roller, a grinder, or a sander is impossible, do the repairs by hand.
Align the damaged or spliced area with a brace and clamps if the damage is severe. For a smaller repair, use a heavy tape on the outer surface in order to maintain the alignment until the inner repair material has cured.
If welding is necessary, do not allow the flame or the welding heat to come into direct contact with the plastic body panels. Protect the surrounding area with a fire retardant fabric. Several layers of aluminum foil make an excellent heat shield if not in direct contact with the flame.
Inspect the rear side of the work area before making repairs in order to avoid possible damage to wires, motors, etc.
Composite parts will not yield or take a set as with steel parts, thus they cannot be straightened. If poor alignments are suspected, due to a collision or other damage inspect the steel reinforcements for damage and replace or repair them before repairing the plastic parts.
Save any useful size pieces of repair material when cleaning up the work area. These pieces can be used for reinforcing smaller repair areas.
Force dry structural bonding epoxy with heat. Heat speeds the cure time and increases the bond strength. Follow the manufacturers curing recommendations.
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Old 03-02-2010, 10:42 PM   #3
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Plastic Repair Precautions
Adhere to the following precautions during thermoset plastic repair:

Apply protective cream to any exposed skin in order to prevent skin irritation.
Wear rubber gloves.
Wear safety glasses when using compressed air and when sanding.
Immediately remove any mixture that comes into contact with skin. The mixture hardens quickly.
Wear an air supplied respirator or dust mask when grinding or sanding.
Use a sander with a vacuum attachment whenever possible in order to control any dust.
Wash skin with cold water in order to alleviate minor skin irritation from glass and resin dust.
Do not get any of the repair material on clothing.
Use repair materials in a well-ventilated area. The repair materials may produce toxic fumes.
Follow the repair material manufacturer'* instructions.
Close all containers after use. Dirt or moisture contamination of the repair material can result in an unsatisfactory repair.
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Old 03-02-2010, 10:42 PM   #4
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Plastic Structure Repair
Before proceeding, refer to General Plastic Repair Instructions and Plastic Repair Precautions .





Clean and inspect the damaged area. Refer to General Plastic Repair Instructions .



Clamp or tape the damaged area in order to maintain alignment.
Prepare the damaged area for the installation of a backing patch.
If the rear of the damage is accessible, proceed with steps 4 through 6.
If the rear of the damage is not accessible, proceed to step 7.




Scuff the inner surface with a #80 grit disc on a D A sander or by hand if the access is limited.



Determine the proper repair material. Refer to Repair Materials - Flexible Plastic Part or Repair Materials - Rigid Plastic Part .
Mix the repair material following the manufacturers instructions.
Following the manufacturers instructions, apply the repair material to the inner surface.



Apply a backing patch and proceed to step 21. Refer to Backing Patch Fabrication .



If the rear of the damaged area is not accessible, remove some of the damaged material in order to form an access hole through which you can slip a backing patch.
Cut a backing patch from a scrap piece of panel. Refer to Backing Patch Fabrication .
Sand the mating surface of the patch.
Reach through the access hole and sand the underside of the repair area.



Drill 2 holes in the backing patch.
Thread a piece of waxed wire through the holes in order to assist in holding the patch in place after installation.
Determine the proper repair material. Refer to Repair Materials - Flexible Plastic Part or Repair Materials - Rigid Plastic Part .
Following the manufacturers recommendations, mix the correct repair material.
Following the manufacturers recommendation, apply the correct repair material to the mating surface of the patch.



Slip the patch through the access hole.
Pull up hard on the waxed wire until the repair material squeezes out on all sides.



Twist the wire around a piece of wood in order to hold the patch in position until the repair material cures.



Cure the repair material according to the manufacturers instructions.



Remove any tape, clamps, or waxed wire used to maintain alignment.



On the outer surface of the panel, bevel the damaged area with a #50 grit Roloc disc in order to extend the contact between the repair material and the substrate.



Using a D A sander, feather out several inches beyond the damaged area in order to remove any paint or primer from the substrate, and provide a proper adhesion surface.
Use a #80 grit disc on rigid panels.
Use a #180 grit disc on flexible panels.




Carefully and smoothly apply a light coat of repair material to the damaged area.



Add mat material as needed to strengthen.
Apply a final layer of repair material (1) at a slightly higher level than the surrounding area.



Cure the repair material according to the manufacturers instructions.



Rough out the surface using a #80 grit disc on a D A sander or a curved-tooth body file.



Finish sanding using a #220-320 grit wet or dry sandpaper on a sanding block.
Prime and refinish as necessary. Refer to GM 4901 M-D for a listing of approved materials. Follow the procedures recommended by the material manufacturer.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Document ID# 261222
1999 Pontiac Bonneville
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Old 03-02-2010, 10:46 PM   #5
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there are some general GM plastic body repair instructions. I have not taken on such repairs myself so I ccant offer any advice. read them over then decide if this is someting u want take on. Also here are some possible materials to consider

Repair Materials - Flexible Plastic Part
Thermoset Plastic Type
Type of Repair
Recommended Repair Material
Availability

Most flexible and semi flexible plastic*
Most repairs*
GM Goodwrench Compoxy Repair Material (GM P/N 12377980* or equivalent)
GM Dealer/Retailer

CMR-8 Composite Repair Material, P/N 82091 or equivalent
Refer to local paint supplier

* TPO, TEO, (Polyolefin Plastics) require the application of GM P/N 1052364 polyolefin adhesive primer before the GM P/N 12377980 repair compound is applied.
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