Bleeding Brakes - Page 2 - GM Forum - Buick, Cadillac, Chev, Olds, GMC & Pontiac chat


1992-1999 Series I L27 (1992-1994 SE,SLE, SSE) & Series II L36 (1995-1999 SE, SSE, SLE) and common problems for the Series I and II L67 (all supercharged models 92-99) Including Olds 88's, Olds LSS's and Buick Lesabres Please use General Chat for non-mechanical issues, and Performance and Brainstorming for improvements.

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Old 10-26-2004, 04:12 PM   #11
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Page 5-14, Manual Bleeding, Step 4:

If you must bleed all the wheel cicuits, use the following sequence: Right rear, left rear, right front, and then left front.

Page 5-15, Pressure Bleeding, Step 6:

If you must bleed all the wheel cicuits, use the following sequence: Right rear, left rear, right front, and then left front.
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Old 10-26-2004, 07:26 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karfreek
To get a firm pedal you have to adjust the rear brakes too, they are what give you pedal 'feel'. Take off the drums and adjust them out until you have to use a rubber mallot to get the drums back on. Then spin the hub, you should be able to turn it but have to put some oomph behind it. Then repeat the other side. I have to do this about every 3 months or so, even tho I rebuilt them last year. I require that 'put your head thru the window' feeling at all times.

Jay
Adjusting your rear brakes this way is setting them up to drag, overheating them and burning up the shoes not to mention dragging down your fuel economy. That'* why you have to adjust them every 3 months.
The rear brakes only account for about 20% of the braking and thus should last a long time. My wifes '96 Bonneville has 110K on it and still has the original rear shoes. They won't last very long using this adjusting method.
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Old 10-26-2004, 07:28 PM   #13
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It'* been a while since I did drum brakes, but to adjust them, you get them close, then back up and stop a few times. They are made to adjust themselves whenever you stop in reverse.

If you need a mallet to get the drums on, they are set way too wide!
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Old 10-26-2004, 11:34 PM   #14
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some info on traditional bleeding method here:

http://bonnevilleclub.com/forum/view...009&highlight=

Also, consider getting a set of self-bleeders like Fuddyduddy that work as check valves and let you bleed your brakes without a helper.
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Old 10-26-2004, 11:55 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ranger
Quote:
Originally Posted by karfreek
To get a firm pedal you have to adjust the rear brakes too, they are what give you pedal 'feel'. Take off the drums and adjust them out until you have to use a rubber mallot to get the drums back on. Then spin the hub, you should be able to turn it but have to put some oomph behind it. Then repeat the other side. I have to do this about every 3 months or so, even tho I rebuilt them last year. I require that 'put your head thru the window' feeling at all times.

Jay
Adjusting your rear brakes this way is setting them up to drag, overheating them and burning up the shoes not to mention dragging down your fuel economy. That'* why you have to adjust them every 3 months.
The rear brakes only account for about 20% of the braking and thus should last a long time. My wifes '96 Bonneville has 110K on it and still has the original rear shoes. They won't last very long using this adjusting method.
Ranger, Karfreek is mostly correct(although I do respect your opinion on this). I manually adjust my rear brakes about twice a year(yeah, every 3 mos would be better) I do this when I'm swapping rims for the snow or summer tires. I also will spray some brake cleaner in there to clean out all the brake dust that accumulates. And put a dab of grease on the back plate where the shoes touch. I adjust the brakes so that there is some drag when I put the drum back on. I might have to pound the brake drum on by hand but not with a rubber mallet. The amount of drag I'm talking about is exremely negligible when you talk about fuel economy. I have 80,000(mostly highway) miles on the rear shoes now and I will be happy with 100K.
MOS, I have NEVER owned a car where the self adjusters actually worked properly. Short of owning a car with four wheel disc brakes, I will always adjust the rear drums manually.
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Old 10-27-2004, 12:48 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ol' Timer
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ranger
Quote:
Originally Posted by karfreek
To get a firm pedal you have to adjust the rear brakes too, they are what give you pedal 'feel'. Take off the drums and adjust them out until you have to use a rubber mallot to get the drums back on. Then spin the hub, you should be able to turn it but have to put some oomph behind it. Then repeat the other side. I have to do this about every 3 months or so, even tho I rebuilt them last year. I require that 'put your head thru the window' feeling at all times.

Jay
Adjusting your rear brakes this way is setting them up to drag, overheating them and burning up the shoes not to mention dragging down your fuel economy. That'* why you have to adjust them every 3 months.
The rear brakes only account for about 20% of the braking and thus should last a long time. My wifes '96 Bonneville has 110K on it and still has the original rear shoes. They won't last very long using this adjusting method.
Ranger, Karfreek is mostly correct(although I do respect your opinion on this). I manually adjust my rear brakes about twice a year(yeah, every 3 mos would be better) I do this when I'm swapping rims for the snow or summer tires. I also will spray some brake cleaner in there to clean out all the brake dust that accumulates. And put a dab of grease on the back plate where the shoes touch. I adjust the brakes so that there is some drag when I put the drum back on. I might have to pound the brake drum on by hand but not with a rubber mallet. The amount of drag I'm talking about is exremely negligible when you talk about fuel economy. I have 80,000(mostly highway) miles on the rear shoes now and I will be happy with 100K.
MOS, I have NEVER owned a car where the self adjusters actually worked properly. Short of owning a car with four wheel disc brakes, I will always adjust the rear drums manually.
Though I have never had too much problems with self adjusters, I would not argue with a manual adjustment, even monthly if that'* your thing. I guess we are all anal about one thing or another or we wouldn't be here, would we. The only thing I would argue with is adjusting them so they need a rubber mallet to reinstall the brake drum and needing "some oomph" to rotate the drum after instalation. You might as well just drive with the parking brake 1/4 applied. I would be curious to know how long his rear brake shoes last.
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Old 10-27-2004, 11:42 AM   #17
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Oh i bought a nice old Mity Vac and the fronts went nicely already. Anyone in MN who needs to use it for bleeding or vacuum testing is more then welcome.
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Old 10-27-2004, 05:47 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ranger
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ol' Timer
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ranger
Quote:
Originally Posted by karfreek
To get a firm pedal you have to adjust the rear brakes too, they are what give you pedal 'feel'. Take off the drums and adjust them out until you have to use a rubber mallot to get the drums back on. Then spin the hub, you should be able to turn it but have to put some oomph behind it. Then repeat the other side. I have to do this about every 3 months or so, even tho I rebuilt them last year. I require that 'put your head thru the window' feeling at all times.

Jay
Adjusting your rear brakes this way is setting them up to drag, overheating them and burning up the shoes not to mention dragging down your fuel economy. That'* why you have to adjust them every 3 months.
The rear brakes only account for about 20% of the braking and thus should last a long time. My wifes '96 Bonneville has 110K on it and still has the original rear shoes. They won't last very long using this adjusting method.
Ranger, Karfreek is mostly correct(although I do respect your opinion on this). I manually adjust my rear brakes about twice a year(yeah, every 3 mos would be better) I do this when I'm swapping rims for the snow or summer tires. I also will spray some brake cleaner in there to clean out all the brake dust that accumulates. And put a dab of grease on the back plate where the shoes touch. I adjust the brakes so that there is some drag when I put the drum back on. I might have to pound the brake drum on by hand but not with a rubber mallet. The amount of drag I'm talking about is exremely negligible when you talk about fuel economy. I have 80,000(mostly highway) miles on the rear shoes now and I will be happy with 100K.
MOS, I have NEVER owned a car where the self adjusters actually worked properly. Short of owning a car with four wheel disc brakes, I will always adjust the rear drums manually.
Though I have never had too much problems with self adjusters, I would not argue with a manual adjustment, even monthly if that'* your thing. I guess we are all anal about one thing or another or we wouldn't be here, would we. The only thing I would argue with is adjusting them so they need a rubber mallet to reinstall the brake drum and needing "some oomph" to rotate the drum after instalation. You might as well just drive with the parking brake 1/4 applied. I would be curious to know how long his rear brake shoes last.
I still have the stock ones with 100,448 kmi on them. I have done this to all my cars with great success.

Im not saying you have to put the drum by swinging the mallot like a baseball bat, just a slight tap. I use the mallot so I don't fock my hand. I was shown this method by my brother who was a mechanic before becomming a airline pilot. He still does this methond when he does brake jobs on the side. Ever replace shoes and drums, it is a slip fit that is tight, that is how I I get them to after I adjust them. Also, if you are not changing your drums/pads there are slight hills and valleys that come with wear. You have to get over these to get the drum back on, hence a slight tap with the mallot. The last time I did this was on the lift at my brother inlaws who is a ASE Master Tech with a degree in auto tech and is now an auto tech teacher. I asked him about the amount of 'oomph' that I needed to turn the hub by the stud, he said it was perfect. Put the wheel on and turn it and it basicly feels like there is no drag, this what the car 'feels'.

I dont think my brakes are rubbing because I still get 21 in the city and 28 on the hwy. And, still have the stock shoes with 1/2 the material left. Also, i wouldn't mind a little drag as it feels lime my SSEi would coast for 5 miles from 60mph.

Jay
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Old 10-27-2004, 08:00 PM   #19
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Ok, if you have over 100K on the rears then you are obviously not over adjusting or draging brakes. I guess it was just the way I interpreted your first post.

BTW, who does your brother fly for?
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Old 10-29-2004, 09:12 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ranger
Ok, if you have over 100K on the rears then you are obviously not over adjusting or draging brakes. I guess it was just the way I interpreted your first post.

BTW, who does your brother fly for?
American. He is stationed out of Chicago.

Jay
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