Spark plugs - GM Forum - Buick, Cadillac, Chev, Olds, GMC & Pontiac chat


Performance, Brainstorming & Tuning Talk about modifications, or anything else associated with performance enhancements. Have a new idea for performance/reliability? Post it here. No idea is stupid! (please use Detailing and Appearance for cosmetic ideas)

Reply
 
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 12-31-2003, 11:59 AM   #1
Senior Member
Posts like a 4 Banger
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Edmonton
Posts: 109
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
SSEi is on a distinguished road
Default Spark plugs

How do the heat ranges with the spark plugs work? And how do you know what spark plug has what heat range? And what heat range to use with what application? Thanks
SSEi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2003, 12:08 PM   #2
Senior Member
Certified Car Nut
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 15,928
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
BonneMeMN is on a distinguished road
Default

Heat ranges are how well a spark plug can dissapate heat quickly. It deals with the length of the plug, but the advice is to go colder when you have more mods. If you're running a pulley, intake, exhaust, 180 stat, you should have atleast 1 range colder. I think it helps KR more then anything. Correct me if i'm wrong guys.
BonneMeMN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2003, 12:50 PM   #3
Junior Member
Posts like a Ricer Type-R
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
willwren is on a distinguished road
Default

Close enough

The TR55 is one heat range colder. That would be good for a pulley and intake. I had to go two heat ranges colder very recently. I'm running the TR6 now.

Your auto parts store should be able to show you a chart of the heat ranges and the plugs available.
willwren is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2003, 01:46 PM   #4
Senior Member
True Car Nut
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Purgatory
Posts: 6,313
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
PontiacDad is on a distinguished road
Default

Found on the web:

The heat range of the spark plug determines how hot the plug will get.
The length and diameter of the insulator tip and the ability of the spark plug to transfer heat into the cooling system determine spark plug heat range.
A hot spark plug has a long insulator tip that prevents heat transfer into the waterjackets. It will also bum off any oil deposits.
This provides a self-cleaning action. A cold spark plug has a shorter insulator tip and operates at a cooler temperature.
The cooler tip helps prevent overheating and preignition. A cold spark plug is used in engines operated at high speeds.
Vehicle manufacturers recommend a specific spark plug heat range for their engines.
The heat range is coded and given as a number on the spark plug insulator.
The larger the number on the plug, the hotter the spark plug tip will operate.
For example, a 54 plug would be hotter than a 44 or 34 plug.
The only time you should change from spark plug heat range specifications is when abnormal engine or operating conditions are encountered.
For instance, if the plug runs too cool, sooty carbon will deposit on the insulator around the center electrode.
This deposit could soon build up enough to short out the plug.
Then high voltage surges would leak across the carbon
instead of producing a spark across the spark plug gap.
Using a hotter plug will bum this carbon deposit away or prevent it from forming.
Spark plug reach is the distance between the end of the spark plug threads and the seat or sealing surface of the plug.
Plug reach determines how far the plug reaches through the cylinder head.
If spark plug reach is too long, the spark plug will protrude too far into the combustion chamber and the piston at TDC may strike the electrode.
However, if the reach is too short, the plug electrode may not extend far enough into the cylinder head and combustion efficiency will be reduced.
A spark plug must reach into the combustion chamber far enough so that the spark gap will be properly positioned in the combustion chamber without interfering with the turbulence of the air-fuel mixture or reducing combustion action.
PontiacDad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2003, 01:49 PM   #5
Junior Member
Posts like a Ricer Type-R
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
willwren is on a distinguished road
Default

NGK is opposite from that. Higher numbers are colder heat ranges.
willwren is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2003, 01:57 PM   #6
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 0
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
2000SilverBullet is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
I had to go two heat ranges colder very recently. I'm running the TR6 now.
How did you know to go colder?

I still have the original plugs......damn boots.....but I can't tell from performance. Obviously since I haven't had them out, I haven't looked at them so I can't tell if they are burning too hot.

Why did you go to a v-notch type and not the iridium or GM OEM type?
2000SilverBullet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2003, 02:13 PM   #7
Junior Member
Posts like a Ricer Type-R
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
willwren is on a distinguished road
Default

The Vpower works like the splitfire. Two spark paths for a slightly more efficient burn. I've been running them in all my cars for about 5 years now.

I ended up going another heatrange colder, as I was burning the TR55'* up twice as fast as I should have. NGK suggested to me that I step down to the TR6.
willwren is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2003, 02:39 PM   #8
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 0
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
2000SilverBullet is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
The Vpower works like the splitfire. Two spark paths for a slightly more efficient burn. I've been running them in all my cars for about 5 years now.

I ended up going another heatrange colder, as I was burning the TR55'* up twice as fast as I should have. NGK suggested to me that I step down to the TR6.
Ya, I've been running with splitfires in my Bird and Jeep for over 10 years and wouldn't switch..........but these newer engines seem to command a much more premium plug. If from only the standpoint of not having to slice hands trying to get at the rear ones. A standard electrode, like the v-notch type, should be expected to wear faster than a higher priced iridium plug.

I would have expected that you would be running with a higher end plug.
The factory plugs cost $15. cdn each and the other iridium type cost about the same.
The Vpower plugs must be far less expensive.
2000SilverBullet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2003, 03:13 PM   #9
Senior Member
True Car Nut
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Westerville, Ohio 2000 Black SSEi
Posts: 6,127
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rogue is on a distinguished road
Default

I would say for the normal driver/car owner the iridiums would do very well as they will lsat a long time. However, in my case and other car modders cases, My iridiums have less that 4K miles on them and already I need to move down to cooler plugs. Kendra'* car has cheap copper autolites and it runs just as well as my expensive iridiums. If your going to change them once, get the iridiums. If your going to beat the crap out of them and change them often then go copper of your choice.
Rogue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2004, 11:54 PM   #10
Senior Member
True Car Nut
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Bloomington-Normal, IL 1997 SE
Posts: 3,734
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
macho_mike21 is on a distinguished road
Default

i think that iridium and platinum are not recommended for SC, right? They burn the metal off or something?
macho_mike21 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
 
Reply

Related Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
no spark spark plugs mrfaysah Everything Electrical & Electronic 7 03-13-2010 11:59 AM
Spark Plug Wires and Spark Plugs buickpower3800sc Performance, Brainstorming & Tuning 4 03-15-2003 05:27 PM
spark plugs baccala Performance, Brainstorming & Tuning 23 10-15-2002 01:50 AM
Autolite spark plugs story throb 1992-1999 14 10-11-2002 11:13 AM
which AC Delco spark plugs? 96_Caprice 1992-1999 8 09-23-2002 11:50 AM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:01 AM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.