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Old 07-12-2007, 12:41 AM   #1
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Default A little better handling.......

Most of you know the Zilla handles pretty well. But I know the front swaybar center bushings were shot. Handling improved ages ago when I did the poly endlinks, but the last piece of the puzzle was to find poly front bar centerlinks for the FE2. Keep in mind I already have good aftermarket performance struts, FE2 springs that overlap the F41 spec, Poly endlinks on all 4 corners, and a pair of full-coil spring rubbers on each rear spring.


Guess what? jr's3800 happened upon them by pure dumb luck, and ordered 2 sets.

ZillaMotorsportsEast sent ZillaMotorsportsWest a package about 2 months ago. I did the install tonight.

For FE2 92-99'*:

PART NUMBER
FA7247

McQuay-Norris

Advanced Auto parts

Install:
I found that the new ones don't compress very easily. In fact, I had to shave the little locating ridge a bit to get the bolts to even thread in. They're not going anywhere. I think McQuay just copied the OEM mold with no regard to stiffness or lack of compression. It took a big C-clamp to get the bracket squished down enough to start the bolts even AFTER shaving the ridge off the bottom (the ridge locates in a dimple in the subframe, so leave about 1/4 of it)

I finally found rust! For the first time!
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See how much the OEM'* compressed over time? They were the same size as the new Poly centerlink bushings when new:
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I had a little helper:
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Trim this:
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No more than this:
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Install this direction after you forget:


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The trick? On ramps, remove both old centerlinks, leave endlinks attached, and jack up the center of the front bar so you can get the old bushings out, and the new ones in. Lightly grease the inside of the new bushings and the underside of the brackets with whatever you have laying around that'* greasy. Release the jack after the bushings are in, and then put the clamps and bolts back in. Start the forward bolt first, then use a C-clamp to pull the rear end down to start the rear bolt. These things don't like to compress.

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Road Test:

Front end lift? Much less. That should help with the launches.
MUCH better response entering a turn. Surprised me the first time.
Well worth the trouble, time, and effort.
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Old 07-12-2007, 12:52 AM   #2
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Nice writeup. Been contemplating doing what you did, and wondering just how to go about it.

What was that, $15 or so?

(Now, if someone would come out with poly bushings for the rear sway and hangers...that just may wind up a DIY project)
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Old 07-12-2007, 01:01 AM   #3
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The rear bushings in the centerlinks won't get you squat. There'* too much flex in the brackets to begin with.

Don can give you a better idea on the price. But you're probably close.
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Old 07-12-2007, 01:15 AM   #4
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Nice info Bill, I was going to do this but the part wasn't in stock a few weeks ago when I stopped in.

Do the Neighborhood cats like to hang out and work on the Zilla with you?
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Old 07-12-2007, 01:19 AM   #5
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That'* one of MY cats.

Yoda is a neihbor'* cat, and hangs out with us though. He'* cool.

Keep in mind that I've driven alot of Bonnevilles in the last 5 years. The comment about the rear bar centerlink bushings brings up a good point. Every other Bville or other H body (over 20) that I've driven has been 'loose' in the back end. That is what I fixed on my own. But the rear bar, with it'* relatively weak links isn't the key to getting that fixed.

The solution is posted in another recent topic of mine. Remember when I replaced my front hubs? I took a pic of the right rear wheelwell with no wheel installed. Look closely at that picture.

THAT is the key to neutral handling. At least it was for my own car. I'd bet, based on my own experience driving dozens of cars from this Forum, that nearly every car here needs a little more help on the rear than the front.
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Old 07-12-2007, 02:31 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willwren
The solution is posted in another recent topic of mine. Remember when I replaced my front hubs? I took a pic of the right rear wheelwell with no wheel installed. Look closely at that picture.

THAT is the key to neutral handling. At least it was for my own car. I'd bet, based on my own experience driving dozens of cars from this Forum, that nearly every car here needs a little more help on the rear than the front.
Alright, I'll bite...you talking about the poly bushings at the end of the sway, or whatever that is that'* got all wrapped up in your springs
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Old 07-12-2007, 09:30 AM   #7
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In the springs.

Think NASCAR, grasshopper. That'* where I got the idea from. Cheaper than new springs by a LONG shot, easier to install, and you get full coil support. No point-loading like the little ones you see at the parts store. Two are softer than the others. It makes a difference where you put them believe it or not. I have the harder ones up top, and the softer ones in the bottom of each spring. Once I had it figured out, I drilled three holes in them, and tie-wrapped them to the coils. Just like NASCAR does.
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Old 07-12-2007, 09:35 AM   #8
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yea, mine where a little hard to get in. and i was not able to get them down all the way for a week or two. but now that are down and flush
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Old 07-12-2007, 09:39 AM   #9
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The point that I was discussing with Don last night on the phone (during the test drive) is that because I didn't do a full install, we could see now how much a difference these bushings make with no other changes.

The difference is remarkable.

More on the rear spring rubbers:

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Old 07-12-2007, 09:57 AM   #10
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Those spring rubbers cant be to hard to find locally, I am going to take a look.
As for those bushings...wow....when I am down there i might take a look around to see if I can find them using the part numbers you gave.
I can't wait to see how well yours handles, again lol
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