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Old 10-17-2007, 01:18 AM   #31
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The only thing I would do to that hood would to make a small vent in the rear of the hood to allow hot air to escape the engine compartment. You have air coming in through the grill, the scoops, and the lower airdam. All this air stuffed under the hood has only one place to go.... under the car. If you allow the air to escape from the back of the hood, it will direct all that extra air up and over the car as well as carrying away a lot of engine compartment heat. maybe even give you some downforce if your going fast enough.
I know wren did a thread on under the hood air pressure, something to the effect that all that incoming air gets trapped under the hood and may raise the front end a bit at high speeds. I'm Not sure if it was only a theory or proven to be true but it sounds logical.
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Old 10-17-2007, 08:02 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roadtech195
The only thing I would do to that hood would to make a small vent in the rear of the hood to allow hot air to escape the engine compartment. You have air coming in through the grill, the scoops, and the lower airdam. All this air stuffed under the hood has only one place to go.... under the car. If you allow the air to escape from the back of the hood, it will direct all that extra air up and over the car as well as carrying away a lot of engine compartment heat. maybe even give you some downforce if your going fast enough.
I know wren did a thread on under the hood air pressure, something to the effect that all that incoming air gets trapped under the hood and may raise the front end a bit at high speeds. I'm Not sure if it was only a theory or proven to be true but it sounds logical.
To achieve a little air escaping the back, all you need to do is remove the rubber seal.
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Old 10-17-2007, 09:51 AM   #33
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Rubber seal? what rubber seal?
than you hawkjet, for that explanation. Now it makes sence to me.
I have no Idea on how to get a matematical answer to what I need. I just go by what seems logical. The way I see it, the first part of the sistem pushes the air down to where the filter is. there is one bend there. Then the second half is from the filter to the throtle. there will be another curve here but this one will be a u bend.
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Old 10-17-2007, 10:10 AM   #34
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He'* talking about the rubber seal along the windsheld edge of the hood.

Don't remove it. Engine bay fumes and vapors will be sucked directly into your AC intake vents by the windshield wipers. Including fuel, exhaust, and oil fumes. Your car will stink, and it'* not good for you. That is the purpose of the seal. To prevent that from happening.
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Old 10-17-2007, 10:23 AM   #35
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An engine bay should not smell like exhaust or fuel. If it does, there are other problems that need to be addressed.
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Old 10-17-2007, 10:36 AM   #36
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EVERY engine at one time or another WILL smell like that. Carbon Monoxide is poisonous.

I ran without one for a short period of time with a perfectly clean engine (as it always is) with no leaks, and could still smell fumes and vapors. That'* why I put it back. That and the headache, anyway.

Your life, health, and comfort dictate that seal be left in place. One exhaust leak can kill you. As you're driving, you get very sleepy from the fumes. When you wake up in a ditch, still breathing, you can say 3 hail mary'* and go on with your life.

With regards to the cooling/induction debate above, put my car and it'* clone side by side at 65mph. One ducted to cool, the other ducted to induct. The cooled car will have more reserve power, as the cooling is very effective, and the induction is not.

Location of the inlets/ducts/scoops is critical. The farther back on the hood you go, the more low pressure is affecting you. Low pressure is great for pulling stuff out, not stuffing it in.
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Old 10-17-2007, 11:44 AM   #37
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almost EVERY modded GP removes that seal on the rear of the hood with no ill effects

guess a bonneville is different
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Old 10-17-2007, 11:46 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1993 SLE
almost EVERY modded GP removes that seal on the rear of the hood with no ill effects

guess a bonneville is different
There are many differences in airlflow, duct location, firewall profile, airflow through the engine bay, and a bunch of other stuff. Maybe they do, and maybe they don't.

That'* not the point. The point is that you don't have control over an exhaust leak or fuel leak that you may encounter tomorrow. That seal is in place to prevent that from being pulled into the HVAC inlet at the base of the windshield.

Suggesting a safety device be removed for the sake of performance on a daily driver is not sound advice.

Alex can make his choice based on what'* posted.
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Old 10-17-2007, 11:51 AM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willwren
With regards to the cooling/induction debate above, put my car and it'* clone side by side at 65mph. One ducted to cool, the other ducted to induct. The cooled car will have more reserve power, as the cooling is very effective, and the induction is not.
I'm not sure what this has to do with the cooling/induction debate. It has absolutely nothing to do with ram air (except to prove it doesn't exist). It does point to where to focus your energy though. Because anytime one is developing significant horsepower, dissipating waste heat is going to be a major limitation. It is also likely that effectively eliminating waste heat will impact induction.

Quote:
Location of the inlets/ducts/scoops is critical. The farther back on the hood you go, the more low pressure is affecting you. Low pressure is great for pulling stuff out, not stuffing it in.
This is another important part of ducting on a moving vehicle. It is also an area that can be counter-intuitive. It could be a multi-page discussion on it'* own.
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Old 10-17-2007, 11:56 AM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alexcoqui
I have no Idea on how to get a matematical answer to what I need. I just go by what seems logical.
Alex, so far I don't see any issues. You said you added a radius on the lip of the hood because it seemed logical. It is that kind of intuition you can trust. I'll bet if you continue to do those kinds of things, you'll be fine.
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