3800 Series II S/C-heated throttle body? - Page 2 - GM Forum - Buick, Cadillac, Chev, Olds, GMC & Pontiac chat


Performance, Brainstorming & Tuning Talk about modifications, or anything else associated with performance enhancements. Have a new idea for performance/reliability? Post it here. No idea is stupid! (please use Detailing and Appearance for cosmetic ideas)

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Old 04-19-2006, 09:55 AM   #11
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Correct. The TB blockoff is really not the right solution.

Keep in mind the coolant on the L36 UIM is probably intended to keep the EGR stovepipe area COOL. On an L67, there is no such problem.
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Old 04-19-2006, 11:32 AM   #12
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Will: One of the things Bill and I discussed by PM was that under almost all conditions (excepting boost for the SC cars) there is a substantial vacuum within the UIM that probably should severely limit heat transport from the small-diatmeter stovepipe to the sleeve.

At freeway speeds, engine vacuum is porbably at least 15 inches of mercury. I don't know what the vacuum inside a thermos bottle is, but I'll bet it'* not much more than that.

So, you're probably correct in asserting that, rather than throttle body heat, the primary purpose of the UIM coolant passages is to cool the area after a hot shutdown.
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Old 04-19-2006, 11:33 AM   #13
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the FSM for 93 States the the coolant is passed through (underneath) the TB to Prevent Icing on cold startups
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Old 04-19-2006, 11:41 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1993 SLE
the FSM for 93 States the the coolant is passed through (underneath) the TB to Prevent Icing on cold startups
That strikes me as an abundance of caution. Both the EGR transport tube and an exhaust loop are right underneath the TB.

Icing takes place only under very discrete conditions (but at surprisingly high air temperatures, ask any pilot!)

It strikes me that if an airplane engine gets away with heated air deicing, an automobile certainly can, noting that most aircraft engines are air cooled, so hot air'* all they have to work with.
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Old 04-19-2006, 11:44 AM   #15
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Do you suppose iced over TB'* were really an issue though? Or would that just be in the supercharged models that are pulling more air? I do know that top fuelers spray some de-icer on the throttle plates before running because they ice over in 60* weather still, but that'* apples to oranges I suppose.
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Old 04-19-2006, 11:54 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MyLittleBlackBird
Do you suppose iced over TB'* were really an issue though? Or would that just be in the supercharged models that are pulling more air? I do know that top fuelers spray some de-icer on the throttle plates before running because they ice over in 60* weather still, but that'* apples to oranges I suppose.
Supercharged cars should be less prone to icing, as the inlet of the SC heats up very quickly due to friction (high velocity air on the rough inlet surface of the TB). This is actually the hottest surface/part of the Eaton Supercharger in operation according to thermal analysis. Even hotter than the outlet.
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Old 04-19-2006, 11:59 AM   #17
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You know, I was looking at this N/A LIM I got yesterday and it occurred to me when i turned around and looked at a blower manifold for the traditional Pontiac V-8 I have hanging on the wall that if I couldn't fabricate a cool little 4-71 blower manifold (Maybe even a 6-71) out of it, I ain't no hot rodder.
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Old 04-19-2006, 02:18 PM   #18
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If your going to block the ports, reduce the size of the EGR stovepipe. That coolant is what keeps it from burning through. I would not do it.
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Old 04-19-2006, 03:38 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Dillon
Quote:
Originally Posted by vptruman
whatcha thinkin' about?
Whether heating the throttle body is necessary at all.
I have a Northstar 75mm Throttle Body on my car, the coolant passages in the intake manifold have been plugged.

I drive the car all winter like this and so far I've experienced -30*C weather without any signs of trouble. Safe to say you'd be ok in California.

Cheers,
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Old 04-20-2006, 01:58 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willwren
If you look at my latest engine bay pic at http://bc.atcx.com/cotm/2006/03/s_performance.jpg , you'll see I have little temp strips all over? I have 8 on the top end now. Trying to see if the coolant flow actually helps COOL the SC and TB at higher boost levels after long hot runs. The coolant obviously heats it after starting, particularly with a drilled thermostat, but what is the net effect when the SC is creating heat itself?

I'm figuring out all aspects of your question as we speak. I will not be using a 'permanent' method of plugging the holes in the lIM if I go that way. I'll be plugging it with either a threaded plug that can be removed later or with a freeze-plug type device. But first, I have to know what high-rpm, high boost run does in the heat of summer.
This is what I'm thinking too esp. when I'm at the track and my coolant is cooler then the temps that my supercharger runs at.
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