HELP PLEASE!!! WRONG OIL??? - Page 2 - GM Forum - Buick, Cadillac, Chev, Olds, GMC & Pontiac chat


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Old 11-03-2002, 08:56 PM   #11
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I used to work retail and we had an automotive section and for the synthetic oil it was 5W50. Take a look at some other oils out there that are synthetic and you may find similar resluts. We used to sell alot of it too.

But that'* just my 0,02$
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Old 11-04-2002, 09:40 AM   #12
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FYI
W="Winter" is a myth.........The "W" signifies the low-temperature pour character of the oil and also its minimum viscosity at 212 degrees F. Oils meeting the SAE'* low temperature requirements have a "W" after the viscosity rating (example: 10W), and oils that meet the high ratings have no letter (example SAE 30). An oil is rated for viscosity by heating it to a specified temperature, and then allowing it to flow out of a specifically sized hole. Its viscosity rating is determined by the length of time it takes to flow out of the hole. If it flows quickly, it gets a low rating. If it flows slowly, it gets a high rating.

So Drifter420 you were right

For the proper oil suited for your car look on the Oil Filler Cap or in your manual, not some grease monkey at a lube shop, better yet, do it yourself! then you know!
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Old 11-04-2002, 01:23 PM   #13
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Default THANKS FOR ALL THE HELP!

Fellas,

Thanks for all the help! I went in yesterday afternoon after all the feedback and a little research of my own and explained to the manager what happened. He was really cool about it and apologized for the tech that put in the wrong oil. He put in Mobil 1 Synthetic....5W-30. Thanks again!

Jason
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Old 11-04-2002, 02:29 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PontiacXcitement
FYI
W="Winter" is a myth.........The "W" signifies the low-temperature pour character of the oil and also its minimum viscosity at 212 degrees F. Oils meeting the SAE'* low temperature requirements have a "W" after the viscosity rating (example: 10W), .

!
Low temperature equals winter time.

Thats when low temperatures are around and that is why they use a W to signify oils approved for winter use.
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Old 11-04-2002, 03:00 PM   #15
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I thought "W" stands for "Weight" as in how thick the fluid is. I know they use that for shocks.. and stiffer dampener requires either a smaller shock piston hole or thicker "weight" fluid.. It seems the same with grease too. Heavy industrial grease are usually rated at 10,000 "weight"
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Old 11-04-2002, 07:33 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drifter420
I thought "W" stands for "Weight" as in how thick the fluid is. I know they use that for shocks.. and stiffer dampener requires either a smaller shock piston hole or thicker "weight" fluid.. It seems the same with grease too. Heavy industrial grease are usually rated at 10,000 "weight"
No W is the designation used for low temp or winter approved oils.

If you look at the monograde viscosity oils they don't have a W anywhere on them because they are not approved for winter use.

jr's3800

My shop does have a part on all reciepts where we can put in comments and when ever anyone requests some funky oil in a new car and we can't talk them out of it we make a note of it their. The note also goes into our computer records for the vehicles service history.
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Old 11-05-2002, 01:18 AM   #17
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Quote:

Low temperature equals winter time.

Thats when low temperatures are around and that is why they use a W to signify oils approved for winter use.

Yea like winter time in Florida and California or Arizona when its "freezin'" not!, better informed ppl know it doesn't stand for Winter.
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Old 11-05-2002, 02:50 AM   #18
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Quote from the SAE website:
Base stocks can be classified in any of eight viscosities ranging from SAE 5W (low) to SAE 50 (high) The W after the number, as in SAE 5W, SAE 10W, SAE 15W, and SAE 20W, means the oil is rated for flow at 0 degrees F (for winter use). Without the W, as in SAE 20, SAE 30, SAE 40, and SAE 50, the ratings are measured at 210 degrees F. Multi-viscosity oils, which are denoted by SAE ratings such as SAE 20W50, have been compounded to act like a 20W oil at 0 degrees F and like a 50 weight oil at 210 degrees F.
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Old 11-05-2002, 10:42 AM   #19
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You asked: (this is from a SAE website)

Straight weight oil viscosity levels (5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, etc.) have a number, often followed by the letter "W". The "W" signifies the low-temperature pour character of the oil and also its minimum viscosity at 212 degrees F.

Since the 1960'*, multi-viscosity oils have been popular.
In simple terms, a multi-viscosity oil, such as 10W-40, means that the oil will pour and flow like a 10-weight oil at very low temperatures yet offer the same lubrication ability as 40-weight oil when the engine reaches operating temperatures. bla...bla...bla
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