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Old 08-28-2006, 11:21 PM   #1
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Default Intercooler core questions

Iíve noticed that many if not all of the intercooler cores for roots style superchargers the 3800 have Aluminum heat exchangers in them. Why isnít copper used more extensively for fins and such (aside from a purely $ standpoint)? Copper is much more thermal conductive when compared to Aluminum. Copper (401 W/mK) VS Aluminum (237 W/mK) Given they are both in pure forms. With a copper heat exchanger wouldnít you be able to have a smaller core with less of a pressure drop from pushing through the fins?

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Old 08-28-2006, 11:30 PM   #2
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I would be worried about the strength and durability of copper . You wouldn't want a piece comming of to go into the cylinders.
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Old 08-29-2006, 12:34 AM   #3
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Copper is not the problem...it'* the solder joints that are trouble.

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Old 08-29-2006, 12:37 AM   #4
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Copper loses it'* heat-transfer properties as it corrodes. And you cannot prevent it from corroding.

Aluminum will only corrode to a point (oxidize), then that layer of oxidization protects itself. And aluminum can be anodized to prevent it, or a better alloy chosen.

No such luck with Copper.
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Old 08-29-2006, 12:58 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willwren
Copper loses it'* heat-transfer properties as it corrodes. And you cannot prevent it from corroding.

Aluminum will only corrode to a point (oxidize), then that layer of oxidization protects itself. And aluminum can be anodized to prevent it, or a better alloy chosen.

No such luck with Copper.
I was thinking that corrosion might be a problem which would prevent it from being used. I know Whipple uses some sort of Copper & Nickel in the intercooler cores for their offshore power boats. Just tossing around some ideas in my head ; thanks for the input.

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