Fuel Filter replacement...now or later...? - GM Forum - Buick, Cadillac, Chev, Olds, GMC & Pontiac chat


Buick When starting new posts, please specify YEAR, MAKE, MODEL, ENGINE type, and whatever modifications you have made.

Reply
 
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 03-17-2011, 04:13 PM   #1
Junior Member
Posts like a Ricer Type-R
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 21
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
wizzard1222 is on a distinguished road
Default Fuel Filter replacement...now or later...?

While working on my rear brake, I thought I would inspect the fuel filter on my 1989 Buick Sword Custom 3.8 L...

Wow...was I surprised...



This is going to be a "Bear"...to say the least... I'm thinking a complete rebuild due to the rust conditions & location of the other 'service line' present in the confined area...

Anyone else tackled a similar project...? Sources for good gasoline line & connectors...?

I'm thinking I may have to replace the return lines of gas to the tank (gas vapors & vacuum?)...not yet sure what all these might be or their condition...I just kinda back peddled when I got my 1st assessment....

Your thoughts & experiences will be greatly appreciated...
wizzard1222 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2011, 05:59 PM   #2
Retired Senior Admin

Expert Gearhead
 
Danthurs's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Sheboygan Wisconsin
Posts: 29,661
Thanks: 0
Thanked 16 Times in 13 Posts
Danthurs is a name known to allDanthurs is a name known to allDanthurs is a name known to allDanthurs is a name known to allDanthurs is a name known to allDanthurs is a name known to all
Default

Break out the penetrating oil. Remember to turn the filter, not the nut on the fuel line.
Danthurs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2011, 06:01 PM   #3
Senior Administrator


Certified Car Nut
 
Mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Horseheads, NY
Posts: 15,641
Thanked 995 Times in 772 Posts
Mike has a reputation beyond reputeMike has a reputation beyond reputeMike has a reputation beyond reputeMike has a reputation beyond reputeMike has a reputation beyond reputeMike has a reputation beyond reputeMike has a reputation beyond reputeMike has a reputation beyond reputeMike has a reputation beyond reputeMike has a reputation beyond reputeMike has a reputation beyond repute
Default

You even sneeze on that thing the wrong way and your going to have a fuel leak.

If you remove the fuel filter, that line is more than likely going to twish and break.

Nobody sells direct replacement fuel lines that I know of, Napa offered me 3/8" brake line for a close replacement.

Your best bet, replace EVERYTHING between the tank and engine. I'm sure the metal lines coming out of the tank look the same way unless the sending unit was replaced recently.
Mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2011, 09:02 PM   #4
Junior Member
Posts like a Ricer Type-R
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 21
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
wizzard1222 is on a distinguished road
Default

I agree that this is going to be a mess.....I'm collecting info., reading posts & the vehicle repair manuals from GM, FoMoCo & Audi that I have access to....some help there.

The 1991 Lincoln Town Car "CEO" (Exec.) factory repair manual describes several pages w/diagrams for their repair/replacement suggestions on the pressure lines, return lines & vapor canister returns...They mention back then that they strongly recommended & supplies the nylon (5/16th) tubing instead of any metal-steel or other materials. Most of the nylon 'sections' were available w/special 'push-on' connectors. They also showed special 5 barbed brass looking splicing connectors.

I think I'll continue to look along these lines for a new 'spliced' nylon 5/16th inch fuel system lines...I'll post my progress w/photos when possible...

Thanks for the help & suggestions...
wizzard1222 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2011, 09:19 PM   #5
Junior Member
Posts like a Ricer Type-R
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 21
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
wizzard1222 is on a distinguished road
Default

I don't particularly like the concept of having to use steel fuel replacement lines that will require using the flaring tools. I have used the flaring tools to repair my brake lines several times. Now that'* a PITA...You have to be very careful when making the flare to match the receiving nuts...if you don't have the proper amount of pressure applied...it'* a cut-it-off...re-do....sometimes in a tight space or w/difficult to handle 'modeled-shaped' steel tubing...w/out kinking the tubing section...

Just not interested in revisiting that system/method if I can avoid it....!!!
wizzard1222 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2011, 10:26 PM   #6
Senior Administrator


Certified Car Nut
 
Mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Horseheads, NY
Posts: 15,641
Thanked 995 Times in 772 Posts
Mike has a reputation beyond reputeMike has a reputation beyond reputeMike has a reputation beyond reputeMike has a reputation beyond reputeMike has a reputation beyond reputeMike has a reputation beyond reputeMike has a reputation beyond reputeMike has a reputation beyond reputeMike has a reputation beyond reputeMike has a reputation beyond reputeMike has a reputation beyond repute
Default

I hear ya, Iv'e been investigating using nylon vs steel. Guy at Napa said to only use nylon for short runs(from tank to main line). Something about bursting the nylon lines. ??? I dunno.

I do know that Napa has a 25ft nylon kit. What it consists of for connectors, I don't know.
Mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2011, 12:49 AM   #7
Junior Member
Posts like a Ricer Type-R
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 21
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
wizzard1222 is on a distinguished road
Default

That'* a great start....I'll check them out.

My 1994 Olds Cutlass Ciera has nylon fuel lines...standard....way back then...!!!

I got a driver-side, front tire blowout in Jan. ....I got out to check it out....preparing to change tires but ........oopppssss...no spare...!!! Got my insurance co. to pick-up my tow delivery to my home....

(here'* the story connection)...when preparing to get it ready for the 'lorry'...I found gasoline leaking a fine mist from around the drivers front door zone...???

The blowout (tire flapping) had nicked both pressurized supply line & the return line to the tank...!!! So there are reasons for 'steel gasoline lines'....

Regardless, I still like the ideas & workability of the nylon lines so far....we'll see...
wizzard1222 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2011, 08:27 AM   #8
Senior Member
Posts like a Supercharger
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Margate, UK
Posts: 199
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
rustyroger is on a distinguished road
Default

When my Buick Century had fuel leak I replaced the steel fuel lines with cupro-nickel tubing. Much easier to work with than steel and wont rust. I've lost count of the number of brake pipes I replaced with cupro-nickel, a few miles I'd guess.
rustyroger is offline   Reply With Quote
 
 
Reply

Related Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New CPS fixed, now 4 days later same problem--??? Tdog1220 2000-2005 11 07-28-2012 12:04 AM
replaced hubs now a new noise three days later gmfreak 2000-2005 11 08-28-2007 10:46 PM
should I get the tabs now or later? harofreak00 Lounge 15 07-17-2007 09:54 PM
8 hours later... NOW WITH PICS katfl0res Audio (and aftermarket electronics) 14 03-19-2005 12:41 AM
one day 1600 3 days later 1705 (update now at 1800) 1993 SLE Lounge 11 12-21-2004 09:26 AM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:32 PM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.