Tried to do my own tune up - Page 2 - GM Forum - Buick, Cadillac, Chev, Olds, GMC & Pontiac chat


1992-1999 Series I L27 (1992-1994 SE,SLE, SSE) & Series II L36 (1995-1999 SE, SSE, SLE) and common problems for the Series I and II L67 (all supercharged models 92-99) Including Olds 88's, Olds LSS's and Buick Lesabres Please use General Chat for non-mechanical issues, and Performance and Brainstorming for improvements.

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Old 01-23-2005, 08:03 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BonneMeMN
Really just gotta muscle them off if they're not on good. Make sure you use dilectric grease on them so they don't corrode again.

Twisting the wires helps as well. If you think you'll hit your hand use gloves (u'll be warmer too)
i will try this again tomorrow. I hope it works. Working on your own car withhout paying top ddollar at the shop really helps.
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Old 01-23-2005, 08:05 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ssesc93
Quote:
Originally Posted by BonneMeMN
Really just gotta muscle them off if they're not on good. Make sure you use dilectric grease on them so they don't corrode again.

Twisting the wires helps as well. If you think you'll hit your hand use gloves (u'll be warmer too)
i will try this again tomorrow. I hope it works. Working on your own car withhout paying top ddollar at the shop really helps.
i know steve thats why i told u to do it urself
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Old 01-23-2005, 09:25 PM   #13
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If you have some thin gloves like mechanix gloves use them or you will get some nasty cuts on the cooling fan brackets when the wires come loose from the plugs -I never fail to give myself at least on cut when working in that area of the engine.
If you are putting new wires on take a razor blade and cut the boot away from the socket. Then use a angle tip pliers or vise grips to pull off the wire socket.
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Old 01-23-2005, 10:49 PM   #14
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heh yea that is so true, be carefull on the front, because i got a huge cut on my hand from the fan, the plastic is sharp and the burs make it even worse
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Old 01-23-2005, 11:01 PM   #15
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If your wire boots were like my OEM'*, they incorporate a spring type wire inside them that locks them tightly onto the plugs.
It was easier for me to pry them off with a screwdriver when I took off the exhaust manifolds during the header install.
You really have to pull as hard as you can to get them off.
Highly recommend wear good leather gloves.

Come on Steve....use some of those powerful muscles.
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Old 01-23-2005, 11:27 PM   #16
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I couldn't get the wires to come off the plugs on my car either. I yanked the wire from the boot, sliced the boots with an Xacto knife, and removed the plugs.

If you are replacing the wires, this makes it really easy.
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Old 01-24-2005, 12:00 AM   #17
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Quote:
Come on Steve....use some of those powerful muscles.
Yours are probably bigger than mine
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Old 01-24-2005, 12:02 AM   #18
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Quote:
If you are putting new wires on take a razor blade and cut the boot away from the socket. Then use a angle tip pliers or vise grips to pull off the wire socket.
I will definetly try that tomorrow. Also, I do have a new set of wires awaitung for installment
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Old 01-24-2005, 01:14 AM   #19
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or wrap a cloth around some pliers and use them on the boots. Twist, wiggle, use some WD-40 if you have to.
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Old 01-24-2005, 07:42 AM   #20
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I worked in a laboratory where we had to fit a lot of different sizes of tubing onto a variety of hose barbs, pipes and other connectors. I learned: 1 that vinyl and rubber hose fit up better (on and off) when they are warm 2. When the hose ID is smaller than the connector OD, a good push and wiggle (and some glycerine or dish soap) will often work to help expand and slide the tube over the fitting. 3. It works best to apply force to the end of the tubing to push it off a tight fitting (rather than trying to pull it) Flexible tubing is very much like a chinese finger puzzle that gets tighter as you try to pull the tubing off the connector-same thing with spark plug boots, heater hoses, radiator hoses, vacuum tubing, etc.

If it is tight silicone rubber boots causing the problem, I have good luck twisting the boot to break it loose, then pulling on the end of the boot nearest the engine using a tool I made from an old butter knife by bending a right angle in the tip. I hook the tip under the lip of the boot and pull. This lifts the edge of the rubber, breaks the vacuum seal and expands the inside diameter of the rubber making it way easier to remove. The little tool they sell for this probably works better than my old butter knife, and is probably worth the price, certainly less than the cost of a good set of wires!

If it is inconvenient to run the car enough to get the connectors warm without getting it so hot you will burn yourself in the tight areas, you might try a hair dryer or a heat gun on the boots.

If the metal clips are corroded and really tight on the end of the plugs, (as others have mentioned) you may just have to bite the bullet and destroy the wire ends and boots to get them off. If you do install new wires, use a little silicone grease in the boots to help get them off the next time you change plugs.
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