Plastic Fuel Lines on top of the L67... help please :( - GM Forum - Buick, Cadillac, Chev, Olds, GMC & Pontiac chat


1992-1999 Series I L27 (1992-1994 SE,SLE, SSE) & Series II L36 (1995-1999 SE, SSE, SLE) and common problems for the Series I and II L67 (all supercharged models 92-99) Including Olds 88's, Olds LSS's and Buick Lesabres Please use General Chat for non-mechanical issues, and Performance and Brainstorming for improvements.

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Old 07-20-2004, 08:34 PM   #1
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Default Plastic Fuel Lines on top of the L67... help please :(

Has anybody had any problems with the hard plastic parts of the fuel lines that run into the fuel rail on the L67? They're located under the engine cover, and just behind the supercharger.

Mine (both feed and return) have developed stupid little hairline cracks in them, and fuel is spurting out of them with the car running. According to the parts guy that I just talked to, only the full length fuel lines are available for purchase, and they run for $100-ish apiece, not to mention the hassle or additional expense of installing them.

The feed line is GM# 25623557 and the return is GM#25623558.

Have any of you out there found any ways to replace just the plastic parts above the engine? Also, would cutting the hard lines after the cracks and installing high-pressure hose of the same diameter back to the fuel rails work?

Any help at all would be greatly appreciated, as i'm practically driving around getting high off the fumes (involuntarily ), and with the gas prices how they are, it'* not a pleasant thought thinking that a portion of my wallet is leaking onto the ground...
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Old 07-20-2004, 09:04 PM   #2
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First of all, you should not be running the engine with a fuel leak. You run a very high risk of having a fire start under the hood.

The best thing to do would be to change the lines with OEM parts, or try to get them from a junkyard subject to close inspection.

There is about 50psi in the line with the FPR set at 41 psi. Many people that have intercoolers have cut the fuel rails and spliced in high pressure rubber fuel line with fuel injector type hose clamps. You could possibly try something along this route, but be absolutely sure to use high pressure hose and fuel injectors style clamps (these ones don't cut into the hose).

Maybe you could use a compression union design for plastic water supply lines in a home. These have brass rings that go over the hose and get compressed against the union to seal the pipe. I'm not aware of anyone having tried this route and therefore would hesitate to suggest it.

What ever you do, stop driving the car until you fix it!!

Cheers,
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Old 07-20-2004, 09:18 PM   #3
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I actually put a small chemical fire extinguisher in my backseat because I was kinda worried, but I unfortunately have to drive the car tomorrow to a few places...

Being that I know of a stealership that carries the correct parts, I would like to get this done properly, but it may have to be an eventual thing, as i'm short on cash at the present...

Do you think most auto-parts stores would have the high-pressure hose and clamps? Also, would I actually have to cut the fuel rail, or could I just cut the hard plastic lines carefully and install the hoses onto those, leaving the remaining parts of the hard black plastic lines hooked into the rails as they are stock?
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Old 07-20-2004, 09:28 PM   #4
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If you're tight on cash try the junkyard first. Failing that, you're going to have to get industrious. You won't have to cut the fuel rail, I only mentioned that as an example of people using high fuel line replacements. Your problem in going that route is that you can't simply clamp something to the outside of the palstic hose because it will collapse.

You will have to use some sort of barbed union to splice in a piece of hose. Problem is that plastic hose is next to impossible to stretch over any kind of fitting. This may be very hard to do actually.

Maybe you'll want to try the compression union. This may require the least amount of work and cost, I'm just not positive it will work, it should, but it might not. This might tide you over until you can replace the lines with an original part.

Be carefull!!

Cheers,
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Old 07-20-2004, 09:33 PM   #5
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Sorry if this seems like a redundant question, but the black plastic connected to the fuel rails (as stock) seems to be pretty damn stiff, are you sure it would collapse if I put rubber hose over it and clamped it down?
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Old 07-20-2004, 09:36 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evilsaint
Sorry if this seems like a redundant question, but the black plastic connected to the fuel rails (as stock) seems to be pretty damn stiff, are you sure it would collapse if I put rubber hose over it and clamped it down?
It is stiff, but I would not trust it all to be clamped onto...no way.

Cheers,
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Old 07-20-2004, 09:47 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foghorn
There is about 50psi in the line with the FPR set at 41 psi. Many people that have intercoolers have cut the fuel rails and spliced in high pressure rubber fuel line with fuel injector type hose clamps. You could possibly try something along this route, but be absolutely sure to use high pressure hose and fuel injectors style clamps (these ones don't cut into the hose).
What ever you do, stop driving the car until you fix it!!

Cheers,
Did that exact thing with high pressure rubber fuel line on my brothers SSE held for 25k miles til he sold it and still is holding the last I heard/
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Old 07-20-2004, 09:49 PM   #8
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Would any old Compression Union from a hardware store or something be ok to use in this situation, or should I try and find one from an auto parts store that is specific for rubber on one end and plastic on the other? I sort of get how these work from looking at pictures (thank god for Google), but i'm not quite sure...

Sorry for throwing one question after another at ya Foghorn; I really appreciate the help
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Old 07-20-2004, 09:50 PM   #9
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Cheers,[/quote]
Did that exact thing with high pressure rubber fuel line on my brothers SSE held for 25k miles til he sold it and still is holding the last I heard/[/quote]

Did you clamp the line to the fuel rail, or to the already existing plastic line?
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Old 07-21-2004, 12:40 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evilsaint
Cheers,
Did that exact thing with high pressure rubber fuel line on my brothers SSE held for 25k miles til he sold it and still is holding the last I heard/[/quote]

Did you clamp the line to the fuel rail, or to the already existing plastic line?[/quote]
The already existing plastic line.
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