new pads and now softer feeling brake peddle? - Page 2 - GM Forum - Buick, Cadillac, Chev, Olds, GMC & Pontiac chat


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Old 05-19-2007, 01:43 PM   #11
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any more input on this?
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Old 05-19-2007, 02:36 PM   #12
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Well, if bleeding needs to be done, do it right. FLUSH the brake fluid completely. Over time the fluid will absorb moisture, lowering its boiling point. When brakes get hot, they heat the fluid up too, so the higher the boiling point of the fluid, the better.

As a very cheap alternative (as in, doing this by myself), whenever I do a front brake job, I take off the master cylinder cap, and syringe what I can out of the reservoir until there is just enough fluid at the bottom to keep air from entering the system. I then go onto chaning the front brakes. When you push the pistons back inside the calipers, more fluid goes into the reservoir. Once the brakes are done and bolted in, I again syringe what came out, then put in fresh fluid, Though it isn't a full changeout, every little bit helps.
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Old 05-19-2007, 07:58 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rogers
I was replying back to BonnevillesSince62 about how many clicks it takes my ebrake to lock the rear tires. I have to put it to the floor, and I know I have to adjust them now. I also have to bleed the brake system and maybe that will help make my peddle less soft
Right! Don't forget that when you bleed your brakes start from the Right Rear bleeder, then the Left Rear, Right Front and finally Left Front. Pull the drums and adjust the rear brakes until there is a light drag on the drums. If you do this right, you will feel a dramatic difference in your braking and the e-brake will stop at no more than 2 clicks.
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Old 05-20-2007, 10:29 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandrock
As a very cheap alternative (as in, doing this by myself), whenever I do a front brake job, I take off the master cylinder cap, and syringe what I can out of the reservoir until there is just enough fluid at the bottom to keep air from entering the system. I then go onto chaning the front brakes. When you push the pistons back inside the calipers, more fluid goes into the reservoir. Once the brakes are done and bolted in, I again syringe what came out, then put in fresh fluid, Though it isn't a full changeout, every little bit helps.
It is a good idea to remove as much of the dirty fluid from the master cylinder reservoir with a turkey baster prior to bleeding, as long as you refill the reservoir with new fluid before you touch the brake pedal.

But, I don't like to let the old dirty fluid that accumulates behind the caliper piston flow back through the valving in the master cylinder. This can damage the master cylinder, and I think it explains why a lot of folks end up replacing the MC a few months after changing the pads. Rather, I open the caliper bleed screw before slowly depressing the piston when changing pads. That way, the dirty fluid can be flushed out the bleeder screw through a hose into a pan.

Having said all that, if your brakes were not soft before you changed your pads, and you did not open any brake lines, the most likely reason for a soft pedal is that the pads have not worn into the rotors. This is more noticeable when new pads are used on worn rotors. Adjusting the rear brakes will bring the pedal up, but should not affect the softness of the pedal.
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Old 05-20-2007, 11:03 AM   #15
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Rogers, Why are we still debating this over a week later?

Everyone here has said bleed the brakes.

Why don't you go out and bleed them, and tell us how it feels. That would be the proper solution at this point, instead of continuing to ask opinions.
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