Have to replace a brake line - Page 4 - GM Forum - Buick, Cadillac, Chev, Olds, GMC & Pontiac chat


1992-1999 Series I L27 (1992-1994 SE,SLE, SSE) & Series II L36 (1995-1999 SE, SSE, SLE) and common problems for the Series I and II L67 (all supercharged models 92-99) Including Olds 88's, Olds LSS's and Buick Lesabres Please use General Chat for non-mechanical issues, and Performance and Brainstorming for improvements.

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Old 04-15-2009, 02:29 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hal brodmann View Post
Here'* what I would do. Buy the shortest length of the right size tubing from your auto parts store. It will probably be flaired on both ends with the fittings in place. Cut it to the length you need, cut out the bad section on your car and use flaired fittings.

Use flared fittings....how do I properly affix these to the line after I cut it? Do I need flared ends when using compression fittings? Can you just stick a raw, unflared line into a compression fitting without it being flared? I'm really f'in confused about this for some reason.

Thanks for the advice. Being that you're in Georgia, you might have experience with lines that might have a hole in them or something that can be repaired. For my line, it'* more like it disintegrated. That bleeding method sounds like a good idea though.
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Old 04-15-2009, 02:52 PM   #32
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WIth compression fittings, you slide the nut over the "raw end" and then slide the collar on the "raw end" as you tighten the nut onto whatever your attaching it to, the collar is compressed (thus the name "compression fitting"!) tightening it onto the tubing and holding it tightly into the fitting. With flair fittings, you slide the nut onto the raw end then use a fliring tool (I'm quite sure I've mutilated the spelling of the word!) you put a flaired end that holds the nut in place and allows the nut to hold the tubing firmly in place.
The fitting that attaches the tubing to the wheel cylinder is a flair fitting. If you cut the tubing on the other end, you can use whatever you like. However if you disconnected it using wrenches, I'm pretty sure it is a flaired fitting also.
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Old 04-16-2009, 06:46 PM   #33
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Everything is hooked up now. Couple things--

-Does the idiot light sense anything other than low fluid? e.g. air in the lines and/or a leak.

-I'm a dumbass. Does fluid only come out of the bleeder if you open it a crack? I removed it entirely and nothing came out when my friend pressed the pedal.
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Old 04-16-2009, 07:10 PM   #34
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You've got a ton of air in the lines if you replaced a brake line. The same amount that came out of the brake line when you took it off!
If you remove the bleeder and start pumping the brake pedal, you are simply pusing air out and then when you release the brake pedal, you suck the air back in again. You need to fill the master cylinder, tighten the bleeder valve and pump the brake pedal a few times. Then have your buddy hold down on the brake pedal while you loosen it. When you loosen it, the pedal will go all the way to the floor. MAKE SURE YOUR BUDDY KEEPS PRESSURE ON THE PEDAL UNTIL IT GOES TO THE FLOOR AN YOU TIGHTEN THE BLEEDER BACK UP! You'll hear the air escape. Get comfortable, you will be there a little while. You keep this process up: pump the pedal, hold the pedal down, loosen the bleeder, pedal goes to the floor, tighten the bleeder, start over again.
Keep this up until when you loosen the bleeder all that comes out is a good strong stream of brake fluid with no bubbles.
Then pump the pedal a few times and you're done.
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Old 04-17-2009, 08:45 PM   #35
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Old bleeder screw was corroded, got a new one, it stripped as I was screwing it in.

-What now?

-Is the screwhole itself stripped?

-Can I use WD40 on the screwhole or will it contaminate the brake fluid?

TIA
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Old 04-18-2009, 12:25 AM   #36
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Btw, never shop at Advance. The screw they sold me was definitely a different length than the OEM piece. Ditto for the brake pads I bought there, POS'*.
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