GM Forum - Buick, Cadillac, Chev, Olds, GMC & Pontiac chat

GM Forum - Buick, Cadillac, Chev, Olds, GMC & Pontiac chat (https://www.gmforum.com/)
-   Bonneville GXP/ Northstar Powered Cars (https://www.gmforum.com/bonneville-gxp-northstar-powered-cars-107/)
-   -   Winterizing the GXP (https://www.gmforum.com/bonneville-gxp-northstar-powered-cars-107/winterizing-gxp-245250/)

Rye Guy 10-25-2006 01:20 PM

Winterizing the GXP
 
I have aquired a 1990 Buick Century in mint condition and will be driving it in the winter instead of exposing my GXP to all the winter elements.

Any suggestions as to storing the car. I plan on putting some stabalizer in the fuel and running it through the engine. I wasnt sure if I should be taking the battery out for the winter or not?? The coolant temperature is good, I am good until -40 C.

Also, has anyone purchased a factory cover for their car. The cover is apparently made out of Tyvek with the Bonneville logo. I was thinking of covering it up in the garage.

OLBlueEyesBonne 10-25-2006 04:02 PM

I would suggest removing the battery if the car will not be in a heated environment. If it sits in sub-zero temps without being recharged, as it would in a car driven daily, it's liable to freezing and going bad.

Run the car as low on gas as possible for the minimum amount of old gas to have to burn up in the spring. Run it really low (30-40 miles after the low fuel light comes on) and then in the springs add 10 gallons of premium fuel.

As for your coolant, I'd suspect that -40 should be good in the garage as that will probably stay warmer inside by 15-20* than outside if the garage is insulated and has no drafts from the outside.

Also, I'd suggest putting the car on blocks to prevent flat spots in the tires from sitting.

If you have a problem with mice or other small rodents I'd suggest a couple bars of Irish Spring soap inside the car and mothballs under the hood (soap bars will work too).

In the springs before you start the car I'd check the cabin air filter and the engine air filter for any sort of blockages.

Fuel stabilizer should be ok, but in the spring when you are going to start running the car again before you start it add a couple bottles of octane boost or do like I already said earlier.

As for the car cover, I suggest a good wash and polish before the car cover goes on so as to prevent any paint damage.
Another option/added insurance is a big cotton sheet to put between the car and the car cover.

corvettecrazy 10-25-2006 05:37 PM

I've always read different about the gas tank thing. Everything I have looked at says fill it up all the way. Because it will prevent water build up/reduce the amount of condensation that will be in the tank. A little bit of dry gas or w/e to keep it fresh.

IDK which way is correct, just what I have been told in the past.

ieatfeets 10-25-2006 06:22 PM

fill it up and put that gas antifreeze in the tank run it a min or so to get it in the lines and let her sit. it will fire up easier in the spring if you do

McGrath 10-25-2006 09:50 PM

I would take the battery out and put it on a block of wood in warmer temps atleast.

Ed

GXP Venom 10-26-2006 12:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by corvettecrazy
I've always read different about the gas tank thing. Everything I have looked at says fill it up all the way. Because it will prevent water build up/reduce the amount of condensation that will be in the tank. A little bit of dry gas or w/e to keep it fresh.

IDK which way is correct, just what I have been told in the past.

Your right Man, everything I have read says full of gas, The less air space in the tank, the less condensation can be squeezed out of the air as it gets frigid out. Just add stabilizer and run through. I always keep both of my boats full for the winter.

wjcollier07 10-26-2006 03:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GXP Venom
Quote:

Originally Posted by corvettecrazy
I've always read different about the gas tank thing. Everything I have looked at says fill it up all the way. Because it will prevent water build up/reduce the amount of condensation that will be in the tank. A little bit of dry gas or w/e to keep it fresh.

IDK which way is correct, just what I have been told in the past.

Your right Man, everything I have read says full of gas, The less air space in the tank, the less condensation can be squeezed out of the air as it gets frigid out. Just add stabilizer and run through. I always keep both of my boats full for the winter.

I will second that, thats always what I have been told too.

2.3 Turbocoupe 10-26-2006 01:19 PM

Itís good to keep the battery out of the cold, but there is no substitute for keeping it charged. Personally, Iíd leave it on a trickle charger. Iíd also leave it in the car so that the car could be started and warmed up every month or so. I donít like the idea of the rings sitting on one spot in the cyl bore for long periods of time. Eventually the oil drains away and moisture makes its way in. Ok, I admit itís not going to cause any big problem in 4-5 months, but I think itís a good idea to get all the fluids flowing now and then.

GXP Venom 11-01-2006 07:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 2.3 Turbocoupe
but I think itís a good idea to get all the fluids flowing now and then.

Could you talk to my girlfrend for me??? :lol: I agree i would leave the battery in fully charged and run the car once in awhile. The weather is going to affect a fully charged near new battery.

05GXP 11-12-2006 12:11 PM

By running it and not getting it up to temp,(driving it) you will not evaporate the moisture in the motor. To me it is better to let it sit than run it. Just my opinion. If you are worried about the rings, you could just turn it over without starting it.


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:51 PM.